Police shared this dashcam footage handed in from a truck driver today.
Police shared this dashcam footage handed in from a truck driver today.

Truckies help to change bad drivers dangerous attitudes

NEW South Wales’ top traffic cop has thanked the transport industry for its willingness to call out bad behaviour on the roads after a truckie shared a dashcam video of a car’s dangerous driving.

The clip, taken by a Multiquip driver of a 35m long road train, showed a silver Nissan Maxima sedan overtaking the heavy vehicle as they were both travelling north on The Kidman Way at Darlington Point just before 3.30pm on May 11.

Because of the solid white lines on the road, just north of the intersection of Kidman Way and Murrumbidgee River Road, the truck driver believed it was unsafe to overtake.

While the truck driver was in the centre lane, he was not doing anything wrong as some on social media have suggested, as the lane to his left was a turning lane for the upcoming road intersection.

After receiving the footage the Griffith Highway Patrol started an investigation.

Speaking with car’s driver, a 41-year-old man, on May 29, he allegedly told police: “I’m sorry. I know it was illegal. Maybe I was just tired from working at the farm and wanted to get home.”

Police fined the driver for the offence of “not keep left of dividing line” – which carries a $344 and three demerit point penalty.

About 3:25pm on 11th May 2020 a Silver Nissan Maxima Sedan bearing New South Wales registration was observed by a truck...

Posted by Traffic and Highway Patrol Command - NSW Police Force on Wednesday, 3 June 2020

NSW Police Force Traffic and Highway Patrol Command chief inspector Phil Brooks said they were lucky to have such a great relationship across the road transport industry where operators were willing to share this sort of content, which was “critical for the enforcement of road safety”.

“Given that the operator, and the driver had ‘called out’ the poor driver behaviour in this matter, and our subsequent investigation, we might just be able to change the driver’s behaviour in this matter, in the hope that we can reduce the risk not only for himself, but his passengers, and other road users,” CI Brooks said.

“All too often truck drivers are first on the scene of crashes, calling emergency services, applying first aid, and managing traffic. This event proves what great reach the industry has in influencing road safety.”

Sadly, 130 road users have lost their lives on NSW roads so far this year, 57 of which were the drivers of motor vehicles.

In the last 12 months ending May 31, there have been 50 heavy truck fatal crashes (three less than the previous year) and 56 fatalities from heavy truck crashes (two less than the previous year).

Speed, fatigue, drink and drug driving, driving fatigued or distracted are all the key causes of serious injury and fatal crashes on NSW roads.

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