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Truckies get edge in online dating

Spy has been busy keeping up with all the latest stories from around Australia.
Spy has been busy keeping up with all the latest stories from around Australia.

Truckies get edge in online dating

DATING websites are popular with singles around Australia, including many truckies who reckon their occupation gives them an enormous advantage.

Those drivers Spy has spoken to in recent months claim the extensive travel they undertake gives them the opportunity to meet singles of the fairer sex at many locations.

"Most people who use these dating services have only the area they live in to meet potential partners. But I can also check out any who live in the regions I will be travelling to," a truckie said.

Some truckies can be seen at roadhouses or rest areas busy on their laptops on such sites.

A middle aged South Australian driver said had met a number of ladies for dinner at various interstate towns.

There are lonely single truckies around Oz in various age groups who admit using these sites with some success.

Of course there are truckies who will speak of dates which have turned out to be complete failures.

But on the flip side, we hear that a couple of the truckies may in fact now be involved in permanent relationships from such sites.

Life's a twisted road for love

LIFE has many bizarre twists as a well known-road transport identity recently discovered.

He was at a roadhouse when he saw two truckies.

The elder of the two drivers went to introduce the younger lad to him.

"No need, we know each other from years ago," was the reply.

Tongue-in-cheek our man told the older truckie what a top bloke the other fellow was but added with a laugh: "You wouldn't want him to go out with your daughter though. I'd keep him away from mine."

Some time later the said gent was told by his own daughter that she was dating.

After some quizzing the 32-year-old lass confided in dad who the beau was.

Surprise, surprise. It was the bloke who he had had warned the other fellow about.

Now this lass reckons her new interest is "King of the Road."

Counting trucks to pass the time

A MATHEMATICAL minded Melbourne truckie who gets around Oz carting furniture has a rather strange hobby - he counts trucks on different sections of highways.

He travels with an assistant who also has a licence and so gets to sit in the passenger seat.

In late March he was in north Queensland and on the 88km section of the Bruce Hwy between Ayr and Townsville he counted the trucks he saw.

"The drive took over an hour and I counted 78 trucks. That included those travelling and some which were parked at rest areas or at two roadhouses," he told Spy.

And why does he do this? "It passes the time and is interesting," he said.

Quite popular with the birds

A SUPERFIT NSW truckie keeps in shape by running whenever he gets the time.

Whilst on an interstate run into Queensland the driver was in the parking area of a roadhouse and put his shoes on and went for a jog.

The establishment has many trees nearby which are inhabited by a variety of bird species, including Blue Mountain parrots or Rainbow lorikeets as some refer to them as.

The birds get fed leftover bread by some drivers.

Our mate was jogging back near the trucks when he startled the birds which took off, many towards him.

"Birds seem really attracted to you," one of the other truckies quipped.

Quick as a flash he replied he would much prefer it were of the human female type.

Pilots make for good company

THEY may be different types of transport but Spy has been told consistently lately that many truckies who work in the Northern Territory have friends who travel in the sky.

At least 10 NT truckies reckon they enjoy nothing more than a chat with what they call "helicopter cowboys."

They are the helicopter pilots who muster cattle before they are loaded onto trucks for transportation.

"I see them a lot," he said.

Ducking trucks at the crossing

ON the subject of birds, one truckie was driving across Blakey's Crossing in north Queensland in late March when a rather large duck appeared from a swamp and almost smashed into the windscreen of his Kenworth.

He stopped at the nearby Bohle Roadhouse and another truckie said a swarm of magpie geese birds flew close to his Freightliner at Blakey's Crossing earlier in the day.

Blakey's Crossing is notorious for flooding even after small amounts of rain and has an overflow of the huge Bohle River system. Work will begin later this year on floodproofing Blakey's Crossing which is good news for truckies but maybe not so for ducks and magpie geese.

 

RARE REST STOP: The rest area where truckies can pull over into beside the Strahan to Zeehan highway in Tasmania.
RARE REST STOP: The rest area where truckies can pull over into beside the Strahan to Zeehan highway in Tasmania. Alf Wilson

Urgently needed is a rest area

 

THE drive between Strahan and Zeehan in south west Tasmania is a beautiful one but there is a genuine shortage of places for truckies to pull over.

Several have complained and say the only decent pull-off area is along a hole-ridden track where there is a viewing platform to look at the surrounding country.

A proper rest area along the route is urgently needed.

Gumlu school turning 100

MANY a truckie over decades has delivered small crops from the Gumlu area in north Queensland.

Gumlu is 40km south of Home Hill and 60km north of Bowen.

Until 10 years ago, the small hamlet used to run an annual capsicum festival, a highlight of which was the dunny races.

Entire teams of road transport industry workers would enter and the toilets on wheels had some weird names.

This October 13 Gumlu State School will celebrate its centenary.

The organising committee wants to invite as many as possible and the contact is Nadine Land on 0400 848 145.

Topics:  i spy on the road

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