LOGBOOK FINE: The 53 year old driver from Currans Hill NSW appeared in Albury Local Court on 21 logbook charges under the Road Transport Act.
LOGBOOK FINE: The 53 year old driver from Currans Hill NSW appeared in Albury Local Court on 21 logbook charges under the Road Transport Act.

Truckies are in favour of more work diary education

A WHOPPING nearly 90 per cent of truckies think there needs to be more education when it comes to electronic work diaries.

Truckie Martin de Vos aired his "controversial" views in a video on Facebook recently, calling for more industry-wide education of truckies in a bid to try and stop the number of drivers being caught out with hefty fines for silly mistakes like signing the wrong date or ticking the wrong box.

"Logbooks, as much as they are a pain in the a**, we have to deal with them," he said.

He said he thought the state's government transport departments should run compulsory courses about how to use logbooks for drivers who had just received their heavy vehicle licences.

And most of the Big Rigs' online community wholeheartedly agreed with him.

Clem Wheatley agreed with him "one hundred percent".

"To start with they are very confusing, and it is easy to make honest mistakes, even now, after becoming used to them over many years," he said.

"At the end of the day, when tired, it is easy to make a simple spelling or other mistake.

"There needs to be much more emphasis by inspectors and police on education rather than enforcement. Fining people for minor mistakes such as spelling, is nothing more than petty revenue raising and does nothing to improve safety or compliance."

Martin De Vos called out other truckies behaviour.
Martin De Vos called out other truckies behaviour.

Michael Vella seconded the fact about not wanting to be fined by genuine mistakes.

"I'm a criminal because I wrote the date but I forgot to tick the Wednesday box," he said.

"Another day I wrote my first name not my surname, another time it was my birthday and I wrote my birth year not 2018 and then got fined for making a change and not initiating the change."

But not everyone was supportive of the push for more education, with some of the belief "if you can't work it out you're in the wrong game".

Michael Blythe said he believed no course was needed, but the logbook only needed two things.

One - to be about the driver not the revenue and two, to be up to the employer's discretion as to whether to fine or just re-educate.

"The way the fines are now, even for small mistakes that are easy overlooked, it's pretty clear this is designed to make money more than anything else."

John Smith said it wasn't "the hardest thing in the world" to fill out by acknowledged the contradicting information contained within it doesn't make it "the easiest thing to understand".

"A bit of common-sense regarding grammar mistakes should be put into law though, the penalties are very unreasonable to say the least." 

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