BIGGEST RIGS: Talk about oversize, front view of the wind turbine blades being transported to Adelaide.
BIGGEST RIGS: Talk about oversize, front view of the wind turbine blades being transported to Adelaide. Alf Wilson

The sights you see in the outback

IT WAS a spectacular sight when two trucks transporting huge wind turbine blades between Adelaide and Broken Hill stopped at a rest area near the NSW and South Australian border.

Extremely long is the best way to describe the load, and that would be an understatement.

One of the truck drivers said each blade measured 63m and the overall length of the prime movers and blades was 75m.

Big Rigs came across the trucks at Cockburn, on the NSW-SA border along the Barrier Highway between Broken Hill and Adelaide.

Back view of the wind turbine blades.
Back view of the wind turbine blades. Alf Wilson

They had a police escort and were being transported by two Kenworth trucks owned by Patlin Transport of Melbourne and Adelaide.

Patlin Transport specialises in heavy machinery, mining, agricultural, wharf and civil construction markets.

They have a modern fleet of prime movers, an extensive range of heavy haulage and over dimensional trailers, crane trucks, tilt trays and escort vehicles that are complaint Australia wide.

Their fleet is tracked by GPS Australia wide so that your equipment location is known at all times.

Patlin Transport has 16 late model custom heavy haulage and over dimensional trailers and tilt trays up to 14 tonne capacity.

Wind power accounted for 5.3 per cent of Australia's total electricity demand and 30.8 per cent of total renewable energy supply last year.

These truck and wind turbines were also spotted by keen road transport enthusiast Graham Hunt who lives at Ballina, NSW.

"I was blown away by the overall length and they were the longest loads I have ever seen although they weren't wide. They had pulled over at a rest area with their escorts,” Mr Hunt said.

The Truckworks 650hp Kenworth heavy-duty tow truck with its load.
The Truckworks 650hp Kenworth heavy-duty tow truck with its load. Alf Wilson

The 72-year-old, was heading towards Alice Springs in the Northern Territory where in the past he has visited the Truckies Hall of Fame.

Along the way, Mr Hunt also met Lyle Watson from Truckworks who was behind the wheel of a 650hp Kenworth heavy-duty tow truck.

The Truckworks 650hp Kenworth heavy-duty tow truck with its load.
The Truckworks 650hp Kenworth heavy-duty tow truck with its load. Alf Wilson

They had pulled up beside the Stuart Highway at Glendambo, SA.

The tar-spaying truck broke down in Alice Springs and was on its way back to Adelaide when it broke down again at Glendambo, 600km north of Adelaide and 255km south of Coober Pedy.

"Lyle left Adelaide early that morning and it was about lunch time when I took this pic. They were about to start the tow. I was told by the driver of the tar-spraying truck that they would travel about 100km/h - not bad for such a heavy load,” Mr Hunt said.

Mr Watson, who is based in Adelaide, said the tow company had three trucks and this one was one of two smaller vehicles.

Mr Hunt's association with trucks goes back to when he was an eight-year-old boy and his father Arthur Hunt, of Broadwater, NSW, took delivery of a new International AR-162 five-cubic-yard tip truck.

During a visit to the Road Transport Hall of Fame at Alice Springs in 2015, the first truck he saw was an International similar to the model his father bought in February 1954 - just a few days before the Richmond River experienced the biggest flood on record.

Mr Hunt recalls that the very first task undertaken by his father and his new truck was to collect night soil from Broadwater houses.

The sugar town then had a population of about 200 and was not sewered and no one had septic systems.

The local shire council night soil truck could not get to Broadwater because of the flood.

But at that point, the flood had not peaked at Broadwater and Mr Hunt senior and colleague Pat O'Rourke were able to pick up all the town's "dunny cans” and haul them off to the shire council's "sanitary depot” for burial.

Big Rigs

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