INSPECTION TIME: TfNSW inspectors run the rule over this truck at the Mt White station checking height, weight and speed compliance. Picture: ELENOR TEDENBORG
INSPECTION TIME: TfNSW inspectors run the rule over this truck at the Mt White station checking height, weight and speed compliance. Picture: ELENOR TEDENBORG

Speed limiter compliance guidelines issued for NSW

IN response to industry feedback and interest, Transport for NSW has issued a new fact sheet on speed limiter compliance for the heavy vehicle industry.

The TfNSW (formerly RMS) inspectors undertake the truck ECM checks to ensure heavy vehicles comply with maximum road speed limit regulations and the Australian Design Rules.

Under NSW road transport law, the maximum speed limit for a vehicle with a Gross Vehicle Mass (GVM) of more than 4.5 tonnes is 100km/h.

Under Australian Design Rule (ADR) 65, certain larger heavy vehicles are limited to a maximum road speed limit of 100km/h. This is typically controlled by software installed by engine manufacturers which is designed to limit the vehicle to a maximum speed of 100km/h.

Heavy vehicles required to comply with ADR 65 include:

a) a bus built after 1987 with a GVM greater than 14.5t;

b) a prime mover built after 1987 with a GVM greater than 15t;

c) a bus built after 1 July 1991 with a GVM between 5 t and 14.5t;

d) a heavy goods vehicle (over 12t GVM) with an engine:

i. up to 300HP, built after 01 July 1991;

ii. over 300HP, built after 01 January 1991.

The TfNSW says its inspectors use original equipment manufacturer software to analyse the ECM for noncompliance, current settings and possible tampering with the setting that may impact on the vehicle’s maximum speed.

“Inspectors use vehicle and engine data to monitor speed limit compliance and, where required, take enforcement action on non-compliant heavy vehicles and operators, including issuing defect notices and penalty notices.

“NSW inspectors involved in the ECM checks are specially trained in partnership with NSW TAFE to inspect a heavy vehicle’s ECM installed by engine manufacturers for specified engine types.”

TfNSW said tyre sizes also have an impact on the vehicle’s maximum speed limit and whether defect notices are issued. Tyre revolutions per kilometre vary based on the tyre make, model, load on the tyre and normal tyre wear. Gearing ratios are also relevant.

“Therefore, when checking an ECM, NSW inspectors take tyre revolutions, engine revolutions per minute (RPM) and gearing ratios into account.”

For more details on the new fact sheet, click here.

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