IMPROVING TRAFFIC FLOW: Austroads commissioned a research project to develop parameters that could accurately model heavy vehicle movements during interrupted traffic flows.
IMPROVING TRAFFIC FLOW: Austroads commissioned a research project to develop parameters that could accurately model heavy vehicle movements during interrupted traffic flows.

Report aims to help heavy vehicle traffic flow in cities

AUSTROADS has published a report which considers how to more accurately model heavy vehicle movements during interrupted traffic flows.

Heavy vehicle traffic on the arterial road network is increasing. The length and low acceleration capability of heavy vehicles can reduce traffic flows, especially at intersections.

Road agencies are concerned that traffic modelling software such as SIDRA, LINSIG, AIMSUN and VISSIM cannot correctly calculate the capacity of arterial roads when there are many heavy vehicles, resulting in inaccurate scenario testing and policy analysis.

Austroads commissioned a research project to develop parameters that could accurately model heavy vehicle movements during interrupted traffic flows in Australia and New Zealand.

"To collect the data to serve as a basis for parameter development, we conducted field surveys, including video surveys, at four intersections with signals and one intersection without signals in Perth and Melbourne," said Dr Young Li, Senior Professional, Future Transport Systems, ARRB and a co-author of the report.

"We surveyed vehicle length, clearance space, acceleration, start-up and saturation headways, through and turning speeds, critical gap and follow-up headway.

"We monitored five heavy vehicle types: rigid trucks, single articulated trucks, B-double trucks, double road trains and triple road trains.

"We developed a set of heavy vehicle parameters that can be used as a guide when road agencies are applying them to similar modelling conditions used in the study, that is, arterial roads that are relatively flat and in speed limit zones of between 60 to 70 kilometres an hour. Application of the parameters to dissimilar traffic and highway conditions should be reviewed using field observations."

Report recommendations include testing the parameters under more varied conditions and at different sites to improve confidence in them and testing more specific vehicle types.

The methodology in this report can be used as a guide to further refine and expand the scope of the model parameters, said Austroads

To download the full report, titled Improving the Reliability of Heavy Vehicle Parameters to Support More Accurate Traffic Modelling in Australia and New Zealand, click here.

To register for the study's free webinar by report author Dr Young Li on Monday, December 9, at 1pm, or for a link to the recording, click here.

Big Rigs

ATA says: Supply chain must respect truckies

ATA says: Supply chain must respect truckies

THE Australian Trucking Association has called for all customer sites and...

Pauline gets it really wrong, say truckies

Pauline gets it really wrong, say truckies

LIVESTOCK and Rural Transporters Association of Victoria’s Marla Stone said the...

Business as usual at this truck stop

Business as usual at this truck stop

CALLING in at the Caltex at the Epping Forest, we were pleased to find it was...