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NSW Minister stands by her "electrifying" comments

MELINDA Pavey insists she doesn't have her wires crossed and is sticking to her comments.  

The New South Wales Roads Minister appeared on Channel 10's The Project last night to talk about her statement on Wednesday suggesting "electric shock" devices to be used to tackle the issue of truck driver fatigue

"This shouldn't come as any shock to anyone in the trucking industry (no pun intended)," she said. 

"This technology is being used around the world. It's being used in the UK and it's good technology. 

"It's not a nasty shock, it's just a little bit of a vibe through through a chair or through a bracelet on a driver's arm and it works. It's positive technology.

"Because we're all joined at the hip, I think even the TWU is, in driving down the terrible road toll. We're only going to get to zero if we use the world's best technology." 

When asked if she understood why truckies were upset with her, she said: "I don't think they're all upset with me". 

"There might be a few being wound up by the TWU. There are truck drivers driving with it now who know it's going to improve their safety.

"This is what the conversation is about. I think everyone in the community and truck drivers would be happy to have every bit of technology at their fingertips to make sure they get home to their families at the end of the day." 

In response to being asked about addressing long hours that truckies worked, she said she didn't want truckies driving if they "feel unsafe or if they're being pushed too hard". 

She said there was a shortage of truck drivers in Australia. She said that people might think about becoming a truck driver if they knew about this technology. 

Minister Pavey also said she believed driverless trucks and transport would "absolutely" be much safer, which was why she moved legislation in parliament last year to allow technology to be trialled in NSW. 

Topics:  fatigue management melinda pavey the project truck drivers

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