TESTING NEEDS OVERHAUL: Police conduct roadside drug and alcohol testing on the Bruce Hwy, a Victorian truck driver is calling for changes.
TESTING NEEDS OVERHAUL: Police conduct roadside drug and alcohol testing on the Bruce Hwy, a Victorian truck driver is calling for changes.

Negative positive test delays

TRUCK driver Danny Hanning wants fellow drivers to beware when they are roadside drug tested.

Earlier this year he tested positive to marijuana and amphetamines three times on the road side, by Horsham police in Victoria, but had not taken any drugs.

Mr Hanning then requested a blood test, not standard procedure for the police, usually saliva is sent to a laboratory for confirmation after three positive road side results.

Luckily he did, that blood test proved he had no drugs in his system, but it took seven weeks to come back with a result.

"It was a big inconvenience and stressful time," Mr Hanning said.

The system needed to be changed, he said, as he could have lost his job if his boss was not so understanding.

Mr Hanning was grounded the mandatory 12 hours after the positive roadside test and then had the result hanging over his head until the blood test came back clear.

He said it was unfair and the tests should be 100% accurate or the results should come back within 24 hours.

"I was at the hospital at 11pm that night getting blood taken to clear my name. You're guilty until proven innocent. It's unfair, we (truck drivers) get hassled enough as it is.

"I recommend everyone to request a blood test." Meanwhile Victoria Police say false positive readings are extremely rare.

"Victoria Police is very confident in the accuracy of roadside dug tests.

"The current system performance is 93.3% accurate," a spokesman said.

"Where a positive reading is shown, a further saliva test is undertaken.

"All saliva samples taken in roadside tests are sent off for further testing by police.

"A sample of the saliva test may also be provided to the person with a positive reading for independent tests if requested.

"False positive readings are extremely rare and Victoria Police has robust processes in place to ensure accuracy and transparency.

"Roadside drug tests are done to ensure the safety of all drivers and passengers on the roads.

"A roadside drug test involves drivers providing a saliva sample by placing a small absorbent pad on their tongue for a few seconds.

"This sample is analysed at the roadside in a device that detects the presence of the drugs. Drivers who return a positive result are then asked to undertake a further test which involves two further saliva samples, if this is positive, the sample is sent to a laboratory.

"It is the laboratory results which are the basis for charging the driver."

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