Truckie Scott Pyman of Quorn with Nutmeg.
Truckie Scott Pyman of Quorn with Nutmeg.

Miracle Meg horsing around with new mates

A HORSE that narrowly escaped a pack of hungry dingoes when it was just days old is now living a charmed life with the truck driver who rescued her.

The foal was separated from her mother and had to fend off the snarling dingoes in the state's Far North before being saved by Scott Pyman.

Five years on, the mare lives comfortably in a paddock on her 'dad's' Quorn property, where she has made some new mates.

Nutmeg, fondly known as 'Meg', spends her days inseparable from another young horse Rex, a silky terrier called LJ and Lola, a blue heeler who swims in Meg's water troughs in summer.

Meg's happy life is a stark difference to when Mr Pyman found her - with her umbilical cord still attached - near Nutmeg Well drilling site, about 100km west of Moomba in June 2013.

 

Truckie Scott Pyman,42, of Quorn escued Nutmeg the foal from a pack of dingos at Nutmeg Well, 100km west of Moomba.
Truckie Scott Pyman,42, of Quorn escued Nutmeg the foal from a pack of dingos at Nutmeg Well, 100km west of Moomba.

 

The truckie, 47, was delivering pipes to the drilling site when he saw the frightened foal running from the dingoes.

"She was completely covered in sweat. She must have been running for more than a day to get away from the dingoes because she just collapsed when she saw us," Mr Pyman said.

 

He recalled the dingoes circling his ute, which he used to transport Meg to his truck.

He put Meg in his truck's bunk and kept her alive with milk and breakfast drinks during the 16-hour drive back to Quorn.

Scott Pyman of Quorn with 'Meg' the horse he saved five years earlier from dingoes while on a run to the mines at Nutmeg Well. Picture: Tait Schmaal
Scott Pyman of Quorn with 'Meg' the horse he saved five years earlier from dingoes while on a run to the mines at Nutmeg Well. Picture: Tait Schmaal

He described the five-year-old mare as a "smart little bugger", who recognised his blue and white truck as it turned down the driveway.

"By the time I get to the house, she will be standing at the feed shed waiting for me," he said. "She knows I'm coming home." Mr Pyman was initially concerned about the foal's health and asked a veterinary friend to check her over.

"I was a bit worried (in the beginning) because she was walking on the back part of her feet. Because the dingoes chased her when she was so young, she didn't have the chance to learn to walk - she had to run.

 

Nutmeg – now known as Meg – is a much happier horse. Picture: Tait Schmaal.
Nutmeg – now known as Meg – is a much happier horse. Picture: Tait Schmaal.

 

"I had to lock her in my car shed, a tiny area to stop her from walking. Eventually her feet straightened up."

Mr Pyman said he had not had a chance to ride the horse yet and sought help from a rider friend to "break Meg in".

He hoped less driving shifts would allow him to spend more time with his family and Meg.


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