Blayze Williams was astounded when a story crowning her the 'world's sexiest truckie' went viral.
Blayze Williams was astounded when a story crowning her the 'world's sexiest truckie' went viral. Contributed

Blayze is breaking barriers as world's sexiest truckie

MEET Blayze Williams, the "world's sexiest truckie".

But, the 26-year-old driver from Adelaide is more than just that - she's breaking down barriers in the male- dominated industry by calling for other women to get behind the wheel.

Blayze fell into her career as a truckie after starting work in a yard washing trucks, getting her HC licence just before she turned 20, only because she needed to be able to move trucks around the yard.

But, despite not fitting the usual truckie stereotype, she found she loved life behind the wheel and on the road.

"I love that it's a bit different, (you've got) a bit more freedom, you don't have someone hovering over you and it keeps you moving," she said.

The Toll driver said she was astounded after a story by the Daily Mail, which crowned her the "world's sexiest truckie", went viral.

She thought she might cop a little bit of flak from her colleagues for being in the spotlight but never imagined how far the story would go.

 

BREAKING BARRIERS: Blayze Williams is the Adelaide truckie breaking stereotypes.
BREAKING BARRIERS: Blayze Williams is the Adelaide truckie breaking stereotypes. Contributed

"All of a sudden it went everywhere, with five or six thousand shares," she said.

"It really kicked off in Canada, it just went mental. I had that many messages on Facebook and Instagram and a Canadian trucking magazine wanted to do a photo shoot for the cover.

"I had no idea that it would go as crazy as it did."

But Blayze, who also works as a part-time model and is also a national champion horse rider, isn't letting fame go to her head.

She said most people didn't even believe she was a truckie.

"Some people are so surprised when they find out (I'm a truckie)," she said.

"Especially when I'm done up but, even when I'm in my daggy clothes, they're still shocked.

"Especially in night clubs - my licence says HC and if they recognise it, they ask if I actually driver or have I just gone and got my licence."

While she said she loved her job now, the first time she got behind the wheel was a bit of a scary experience.

"When I first went out with someone, I wasn't too bad but when I first went out by myself, I absolutely crapped my pants: I thought it was the stupidest thing I'd ever decided to do," she said.

"The first time I was in the semi I just freaked out, thought I'd gone in over my head but I ended up getting used to it and everything wasn't too bad but the first initial few days were terrifying."

She said women should not be turned off the industry and encouraged others to give driving a go.

"If they are a woman who can obviously take a good joke from the boys and stuff like that, they'd be fine. It's pretty fun and it's something different," she said.

"There are so many opportunities - there are so many types of driving, your local, your interstate, dangerous goods, general freight containers.

"There's a lot more places you can go, more than people think. I think women should give it a go.

"Obviously there's the physical aspects but I've not been to many yards where they (the guys) haven't been willing to help and, once you get over the first scary bit, you're pretty set."

 

Follow Blayze on Instagram by searching for "blayzewilliams".

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